House Mouse- It has been said that mice will destroy about 10% of the food worldwide.  This species of mouse is the most common found in structures.  This mouse has small eyes and small ears, so they have good hearing, but poor eye sight.  They will live in harmony with humans, but do not have any benefit for humans. Mice can enter a structure through a size of about a dime and will be looking for warmth and food.  Mice lose body heat quickly, so that is why you always see nests being built.    They are a nocturnal pest that will eventually become active during the day if the population increases.  Mice can reproduce at a fast rate. The statistic that I am about to give you is meant to educate, not scare you, and keep in mind it is the absolute worst case scenario.  Under the ideal conditions, 2 mice in a four month period can have up to 200 offspring.  Most houses do not have this type of problem, but could eventually get there. The control of mice is attained by using a rodenticide. Traps can be used, but the latest studies show mice eventually become trap smart. The rodenticide, when placed correctly, will indicate 3 important pieces of information to obtain control and complete eradication. First is to find the travel patterns of the mice. By doing this, the second piece of information that can be learned, is to find entry points.  The travel patterns could lead to a construction flaw not even noticed, even if the "obvious" entry point is.  The third piece of information determined is the population of the mice by the amount of rodenticide eaten.  We have found that when all three pieces of information are learned, total control can be achieved. 

Deer Mouse- This mouse gets its name because of the physical characteristics mirroring deer.  They always have a white belly and feet, but the top can range in color from a light brown to a black.  This mouse has large ears and large eyes giving them good hearing and good eye sight.  This species is the one vector that spreads disease such as Hantavirus and Lyme disease.  They will live in harmony with humans, but do not have any benefit for humans. The reproduction of this mouse is usually determined by food source.  The less food there is, the more unlikely they will reproduce quickly.  The control of mice is attained by using a rodenticide.  Traps can be used, but the latest studies show mice eventually become trap smart.  The rodenticide, when placed correctly, will indicate 3 important pieces of information to obtain control and complete eradication.  First is to find the travel patterns of the mice.  By doing this, the second piece of information  that can be learned, is to find entry points.  The travel patterns could lead to a construction flaw not even noticed, even if the "obvious" entry point is.  The third piece of information determined is the population of the mice by the amount of rodenticide eaten.  We have found that when all three pieces of information are learned, total control can be achieved. 

Brown Rat- This rat is also known as a Norway Rat, Sewer Rat, or Common Rat.  It originated from northern China and spread worldwide except for Antarctica.  Due to this population, it is considered the second most successful mammal on the planet.  Rats do not reproduce as quickly as mice, but given the ideal conditions, they will have up to 5 litters a year with an average of 7 in the litter.  They have very good hearing and very poor eye sight.  They are a colonizing species with a dominant male to rule them.  They will live in harmony with humans, but do not have any benefit for humans.  When rats invade a property, burrows will be found along foundations, under debris, in fields, crawlspaces, and basements.  When in a structure, they will create a tunnel system to maneuver in wall voids, attic spaces, and eventually into the rooms.  The control of rats is obtained by a consistent rodenticide program to eliminate the population.  Traps can be used, but the latest studies show the rat will become trap smart.  Eliminating food sources, such as chicken coops, bird feeders, and grain piles will help in the control. 

Voles- This rodents looks like a mouse, but as I like to say, "It is like a mouse on steroids".  The vole has a shorter tail, a stouter body, and a rounder head than a mouse.  They have between 5-10 litters each year with litters averaging 5-10 young.  They are sometimes called meadow mice.  Once the snow melts in the spring, you may see surface trails by voles between the snow and ground.  They tend to burrow like rats, but will utilize stone landscaping around structures.  They thrive on small plants, but can live on nuts, fruit, and even eat other dead animals.  The control of them is a combination of mouse and rat control.  Some will enter the structure, but control on the exterior is crucial.  A rodenticide is a necessity.

Shrews- This mammal is actually not a rodent.  Its appearance is much like a mouse, but are a much closer relative to a mole.  The difference is that a shrew has spike like teeth while a rodent has incisor front teeth for gnawing.  Shrews have a short tale with a long snout for a nose.  Their food source consists of insects, nuts and seeds. They are not as common as the rodents, but they will enter structures, and nest in void areas where food sources are steady. The control of them is a combination of mouse and rat control.  Some will enter the structure, but control on the exterior is crucial.  A rodenticide is a necessity.

Rodents
Email Millers Pest control At
millerspestcontrolvt@yahoo.com